Porsche giving Nick Murray exactly what he deserves [w/video]

Nick Murray Porsche Update 001 Porsche giving Nick Murray exactly what he deserves [w/video]

The tale of Nick Murray and his lemon Porsche 911 appears to have come to a satisfactory end. As noted in the original story about Murray, he and Porsche Cars North America met and came to a resolution. However, we didn’t know exactly what that meant, until now.

Murray has created a new video explaining that PCNA offered to buy back the car at full price or give him an exact replacement for it. This was exactly what he was asking for. Murray remains pro-Porsche in the new video. “I am definitely considering reordering a Porsche 911,” he says.

Porsche also posted a message on its Facebook page that clarified the situation. “We at Porsche have always sought excellence in all that we do. We know you expect it of us. And when we don’t meet that standard, we make every effort to improve,” said a portion of the note.

It’s good to see a level-headed guy like Murray succeed. He’s getting what he wants, but he doesn’t seem to harbor any ill will towards the company. Scroll down to watch the latest video. Warning, there is some very vulgar NSFW language when he reads several YouTube comments left on his previous video.

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Nick Murray’s problematic Porsche 911 shows the power of a viral video

Nick Murray Porsche 001 Nick Murrays problematic Porsche 911 shows the power of a viral video

When Nick Murray took delivery of his 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera S in June 2013, he had saved for it for the past five years. He didn’t just pluck a random 911 off a dealer lot. He specially ordered his car with thousands of dollars in extras tailored just to him, and he captured all of the options on his YouTube channel. The love affair didn’t last long. Eventually the channel became a place for Nick to air his growing list of grievances about his deteriorating 911. Eventually, his mix of righteous indignation and sarcasm went viral.

Nick Murray Porsche Nick Murrays problematic Porsche 911 shows the power of a viral videoBy late December, he had already had four warranty repairs done on the car. Things got much worse in March. The computers began resetting whenever Nick drove over large bumps. There was also an acrid, electrical smell that occasionally permeated the cabin. Murray filed for Lemon Law protection. ?Porsche Cars North America contacted him for the first time to fix the problem, but it didn’t help.

Things culminated in April when Murray put up a new video that showed more troubles. He began arbitration with Porsche and asked for either his full purchase price back or an exact replacement. The company countered with a portion of what the car was worth, based on its mileage. Murray refused and turned to his YouTube watchers for help. He asked them to spread the word, and the video went viral with over 800,000 views as of this writing. Supporters posted it multiple times on Porsche’s Facebook and Twitter sites.

The pressure may have worked. Murray posted on the 6 Speed Online forums: “Good news! I have been contacted by PCNA to settle this. This whole mess will end today hopefully. Good that they are doing the right thing. Good for them.” Later, he added another note on the forum and Facebook that the situation was resolved without going into detail.

Nick Twork, Product Communications Manager Porsche Cars North America, told Autoblog the that company was “very aware of these videos.” He confirmed that the Customer Care Department had been in contact with Murray, and it met “with him one-on-one.” He promised that PCNA would work with him until “everyone is satisfied.”

Scroll down to watch the last three videos starting from the most recent to see what he went through. Warning, there is some occasional salty language.

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Are you the next Porsche 911 GT3 RS or GT2?

porsche 911 gt3 rs spy Are you the next Porsche 911 GT3 RS or GT2?

Porsche typically keeps to a suitably fast schedule when it comes to rolling out increasingly hard-core performance versions of the 911. After the 997 Carrera debuted in 2004, the GT3 version followed in 2006, and by the end of the 2007, Porsche had rolled out both the GT3 RS and GT2 versions. Then the facelifted 997.5 came out in 2008 and it was back to the start: the GT3 came in 2009, the GT3 RS and GT2 RS in 2010, and the GT3 RS 4.0 in 2011. But things have slowed down some with the latest 991 generation.

The new Carrera came in 2011 and the GT3 followed in 2012. By recent history’s example, we should have at least two more hardcore models by now, but we don’t. Maybe the engineers in Zuffenhausen have had their hands full fixing the spontaneous-combustion issues with the existing GT3, or maybe their attentions have been focused elsewhere altogether. But if these spy shots are anything to go by, it seems like they’re back on the job.

Now we don’t know if this prototype foreshadows a new GT3 RS or a GT2, but it sure looks more hard-core than the existing GT3 that many purists have derided as too soft, what with its automatic transmission and four-wheel steering.

What’s the difference between a GT3, GT3 RS or GT2? We’re glad you asked (even if you didn’t). The GT3 is a more performance-focused version of the 911. The GT3 RS takes things a step further, but keeps the naturally aspirated engine. The GT2 packs twin turbochargers, like the 911 Turbo but without all-wheel drive. Porsche seems likely to do one or the other, and this could be either. But whichever it is – with the turbos or without, manual transmission or dual-clutch – it promises to be one of the most formidable performance machines on road or track.

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2014 Porsche 911 Targa


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The last time Porsche offered a traditional Targa model with a removable opaque roof panel was in 1992, on its 964 platform. Subsequent 993, 996 and 997 Targa models were all fitted with a retractable glass roof that slid beneath the rear window as it opened the sky to its occupants, a clever arrangement that nevertheless caused some annoying rearview distortions. Interestingly enough, it wasn’t until the arrival of the new 991 platform, already offered in coupe bodystyle with a large panoramic glass sunroof that slides over the rear window, that Porsche felt the market was open again for the return of its famed Targa.

Even from a hundred yards, it doesn’t take a trained eye to spot the new Targa.

Even from a hundred yards, it doesn’t take a trained eye to spot the new model from the side. The two-door features a very thick and distinctive bright aluminum “wide bar” B-pillar. Those approaching from the rear will note the absence of a C-pillar, as the Targa utilizes an innovative one-piece wraparound backlight in its place. Savvier observers will note the new model’s slightly wider rear axle, larger tire contact patch, functioning thin red light bar that connects the rear taillamps, black sill panels on each side between the wheels and unique inserts inside each corner of the front fascia. Many of those features come directly from the Carrera 4 Cabriolet, a variant with which the new Targa shares its structure.

While the exterior is freshly retro-styled, the cabin of the Targa is virtually identical to that of the Cabriolet, right down to the two small switches that control the roof, which are located just under the driver’s elbow in the center console. This is precisely as intended, as the star of this show has nothing to do with its commonality with the rest of the 911 lineup. Instead, the Targa is all about its cloth-wrapped, retractable, rectangular roof panel mere inches above the occupant’s heads.

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The Targa commands a $10,570 premium over the Carrera 4 Coupe, but it’s still $1,330 less expensive than the Carrera 4 Cabriolet.

Porsche announced previously that the Targa will be offered in two models: Targa 4 (base price $102,595 including destination) and Targa 4S ($117,195). The Targa 4 arrives with a 3.4-liter flat-six, rated at 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque, while the Targa 4S (as seen here in our image gallery) is fitted with a larger 3.8-liter version of the same engine, rated at an even 400 horsepower and 325 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel drive is standard, but the automaker offers a choice between a seven-speed manual and its seven-speed PDK dual-clutch gearbox. (As of now, all feature bright aluminum Targa hoops and black fabric roof panels, but that may change based on future customer requests.)

A glance at Porsche’s pricing structure shows that the Targa commands a hefty $10,570 premium over the Carrera 4 Coupe, but it’s still $1,330 less expensive than the Carrera 4 Cabriolet. Plus, the Targa shares some commonality with the Cabriolet, helping to keep pricing below its sibling.

Interestingly, the Targa’s development has been a long one – it was actually prototyped on a 997 platform, but the project was shelved for the 991.

As my primary objective was to review the Targa roof, and not its outright acceleration potential, I was undeterred by the half-dozen Targa 4S PDK models parked at the rendezvous spot. Rather than seek out the most powerful model, my feet made a beeline for a standard Targa 4 in Guards Red – with a traditional manual gearbox, an increasingly rare find, especially when one considers it is no longer available on the GT3 and Turbo models.

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As the Targa “hoop” replaces the C-pillar on the Coupe and the pop-up roll bars on the Cabriolet, its construction is understandably robust.

Before playing with the intriguing ceiling, I took a quick look around. The view out the Targa’s front windshield remains identical to that from the Coupe and Cabriolet, but a slight turn of the head to either side reveals the thick B-pillar that defines this model. While most won’t find it interfering, my six-foot, two-inch height required me to slide the driver’s seat nearly all the way to the rear on its tracks, which meant the pillars block quite a bit of my peripheral vision. Thankfully, the two side mirrors and interior rearview mirror fill in the gaps.

As the Targa “hoop” technically replaces the C-pillar on the Coupe and the pop-up roll bars on the Cabriolet as rollover protection, its construction is understandably robust. Buried within the panel is a steel roll bar that reaches all the way to the floorpan on each side. It’s finished on the exterior with painted die-cast aluminum and on the interior in soft Alcantara. The three gills visible on the outside of the bar are not functional; they pay tribute to the original 1965 Targa.

Porsche’s engineers have split the roof into two movable components. The largest piece is the rear glass and its surrounding deck lid, which combines thin laminated safety glass molded in a compound curve with an apron of aluminum that’s painted body color. The other part is the Targa panel, which is a two-section magnesium roof bow covered in a fabric hood that folds into a Z-shape when stowed. (The front section of the Targa panel should look familiar, as it is borrowed nearly intact – with its electric locking mechanism – from the same area of the Cabriolet roof). In addition to the aforementioned components, there are two cable-actuated flaps, on each side of the rollover hoop that open to allow the arms of the roof to pass through.

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The full automatic Targa roof only operates when the vehicle is stationary.

The full automatic Targa roof, powered by a single hydraulic pump (as on the Cabriolet), only operates when the vehicle is stationary. Porsche explains that when the heated rear window panel is tipped back to allow the roof to open or close (the standard integrated ParkAssist monitors the area behind the car preventing operation if an obstacle is in the way), it blocks the view of the brake lights which would make it illegal – and ill advised – to drive with the top in motion. Officials also mention that the rear assembly, weighing upwards of 80 pounds, could make the vehicle less stable under certain driving conditions when lifted high and tilted rearward. It’s always better to error on the side of safety.

Not only must the Porsche be stopped, a finger needs to be held on the roof button for the duration of the opening or closing operation, which lasts just under 20 seconds. (The process is about 30-percent slower than raising or lowering the fabric roof of the Cabriolet, but there appear to be larger and heavier components being moved around on the Targa.) There is no limit to the number of times the electro-hydraulic system may run through its open/close sequence. It may be run continuously, back-to-back, as often as the owner wishes – this is helpful when showing off at a local Cars ‘n Coffee show.

With the panel tucked away and the Mediterranean sunshine falling on my shoulders, I moved the short-throw shifter into first and motored off towards the Italian countryside.

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The standard Targa 4 doesn’t have the low-end punch of the S model, but spinning the engine around the tachometer still delivers brisk acceleration. Porsche quotes a curb weight of 3,395 pounds, 242 pounds heavier than the Carrera 4 Coupe (but only 88 pounds heavier than the Carrera 4 Cabriolet), making this the heaviest of the three bodystyles. Understandably, its published 0-60 time of 5.0 seconds is a few ticks off those of its lighter siblings (those looking for a bit more speed should check out the Targa 4S with Sport Plus and PDK, as it does the same sprint in 4.2 seconds).

The standard Targa 4 doesn’t have the low-end punch of the S model, but still delivers brisk acceleration.

Few cars are as enjoyable to drive as today’s Porsche 911, as the rear-engine sports car obeys steering, braking and acceleration commands almost telepathically. The engineers worked to keep the Targa’s additional mass low in the chassis, with meticulous attention paid to selecting lightweight materials, so handling isn’t compromised.

Most would also agree that a Targa roof improves the experience as it allows occupants to enjoy the benefits of open-air motoring – the fragrant smell of a countryside dotted with blooming almond trees and the pleasant exhaust note of a flat-six – without the gale-force hurricane sometimes associated with convertibles. But don’t expect the Targa to completely isolate its occupants from the elements, as there is a noticeable amount of wind hitting the bright silver hoop directly behind the occupant’s heads and spilling into the cabin at speeds above 50 mph. Your date’s hair won’t be ruffled to shambles and nothing in the cockpit will blow out, but there is a strong breeze and conversation is slightly challenged when the top is stowed.

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Engineering a Targa roof for a late-model vehicle, with a low drag coefficient, is more difficult than it was in the 1960s when steeply angled windshields blew the air far over the cabin. Plus, the “jump” (the distance between the windshield surround and Targa hoop) is much greater, which contributes to the problem. Buffeting is inevitable, but to reduce some of the turbulent air, engineers have placed a manually adjustable two-position wind blocker at the top of the windshield header. Its raised position is most effective to reduce airflow, but it’s also the loudest, as it places the small plastic wing directly into the slipstream. Keep it in its default low setting for best results.

There is a noticeable amount of wind hitting the bright silver hoop and spilling into the cabin at speeds above 50 mph.

To accommodate its slightly heavier curb weight, Porsche has retuned the Targa’s front MacPherson struts and rear multi-link suspension. But instead of matching the damping of the Coupe and Cabriolet, the Targa has been calibrated for a slightly more compliant ride to suit its role as an all-season grand tourer. The roads in Southern Italy would earn no better than a C- grade, as the surfaces under the Porsche’s wide Pirelli PZeros (the optional tires were sized 245/35ZR20 front and 305/30ZR20 rear) were broken and rutted more often than not. Regardless, the Targa’s ride was surprisingly comfortable. The optional Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) system, left in its softest setting, proved enough to keep the wheels from impacting harshly over even the roughest sections.

After fielding countless questions about body rigidity, Porsche’s engineers confided that the Targa is about 10 percent stiffer than the Cabriolet model upon which it is based (the Coupe is reportedly twice as rigid as the Cabriolet). Officials also say that the rigidity is the same with or without the Targa panel in place – it’s not a structural part of the chassis, which improves suspension tuning. In any case, bouncing over ruts, crashing over railroad crossings and being surprised by potholes seemed to have no measurable effect on the platform in either configuration, but some other journalists reported squeaking in the gasket between the windshield surround and Targa panel when their roofs were closed. Porsche should have it addressed by the time production vehicles roll off the line.

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While it lacks the single-minded sportiness of the enthusiast’s-choice Coupe, the Targa is fresh and distinctive.

It seems no orientation with an open-roof car is complete unless Mother Nature is allowed to test its weatherproofing. As huge raindrops fell from the clouds, a quick detour to the side of the road had the Targa’s roof secured back in place and the coupe sealed tight from the elements. Back at speed, the cabin was hushed. My recollection is that the Coupe is still quieter (albeit with more tire noise), but the Targa’s cabin levels are on par with the Cabriolet, which is itself impressive for a softtop convertible.

Porsche says the 911 Targa will roll into showrooms at the end of June, and a full day with the new model leads me to believe customers won’t be hard to find. While it lacks the single-minded sportiness of the enthusiast’s-choice Coupe, the Targa is fresh and distinctive on the road. Its uniqueness, fascinating roof-mechanism kinematics and all-weather capability are sure to appeal to its affluent clientele seeking an open-roof solution. Don’t be surprised if it’s a success.

If there’s one thing I’ve learned over the years, it’s that Stuttgart doesn’t do anything half-baked – all of its products, from its entry-level Boxster to its flagship hybrid 918 Spyder, represent no-compromise engineering. That’s true even when a model’s usage case and audience is decidedly narrower. That’s certainly the situation with this 2014 911 Targa 4, a car that stands as a meticulous modern interpretation of a celebrated model from Porsche’s past.

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Take a POV hot lap in the Porsche 918 Spyder

patrick long 918 pov Take a POV hot lap in the Porsche 918 Spyder

That title about says it all. This is a hot lap of the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, TX, with Porsche Works Driver Patrick Long at the wheel of a Porsche 918 Spyder. The camera is basically showing us everything that Long sees, making this not just one of the coolest 918 videos we’ve seen, but also one of the neatest laps of CoTA.

As Long peers through the bends, so will you. You’ll see him fight the wheel, and find out just how difficult it is to hustle this hybrid hypercar around a world-class track at speed. It’s pretty darn entertaining. There are also a few scattered shots of the 918′s exterior just to break up the interior awesomeness, although we aren’t exactly complaining about those. Take a look below for the short video from Porsche.

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Porsche gives GT3 owners extra year of warranty, new engines in production April 22

 Porsche gives GT3 owners extra year of warranty, new engines in production April 22

While the auto industry reels from massive recall after massive recall, Porsche has quietly been working on a fix for an issue that’s forced owners of the new 911 GT3 to park their track-ready rockets for fear of an engine fire. Thanks to a leaked letter from Porsche to a GT3 owner (which has been certified as real), we now have an idea of just where the German brand is at with the fix.

On April 22, Porsche will begin production of a new batch of GT3 engines for the 785 affected models across the globe. As you’ll recall, the original issue rested with a screw joint that could loosen the connecting rod. The new engines have an “optimized piston rod screw connection,” that should keep the connecting rod in place. Once technical validations are completed, production will kick off and new powerplants will be shipped around the globe for owners of the troubled cars.

Porsche will hand out a certificate to owners of affected cars once repairs have been completed, as a means of documenting the work. To make up for the trouble, Porsche will be giving owners an extra year on their new-vehicle warranty, while the 911 GT3 concierge will be reaching out to compensate them for having to park their car for so long.

Take a look at the letter below. And if you happen to be a 911 GT3 owner, congratulations, hopefully you’ll be driving your car soon.

Dear Mr. [REDACTED]: I am writing as promised to inform you about the current status of our solution to the issue with the Porsche 911 GT3 model you have purchased. We are aware that you are currently faced with an unsatisfactory situation. As a Porsche customer, you rightfully expect excellence in product and service performance. This particularly applies to you as a GT3 customer, as a brand ambassador with a shared passion for Porsche. We are in the final phase of logistics planning and technical validation for the optimized piston rod screw connection and we will start production of the new engines the week of April 22nd. These engines will be distributed worldwide for installation in all 991-generation GT3 models built to date. As soon as the new engine for your Porsche 911 GT3 is available, we will make contact with you again to make specific arrangements. Please be assured that we will document the installation of the new engine into your vehicle and will provide you with a certificate to this effect. Furthermore, as a gesture of our appreciation for your loyalty to Porsche, we will apply an additional 12-month Porsche Approved warranty to your 991 GT3 which will commence upon the expiration of the normal Porsche New Vehicle Limited Warranty. Additionally, we wish to compensate you for your inability to drive your GT3 during this time. Our GT3 Concierge will be in touch with you shortly to discuss the specifics and will also be at your service for any other individual assistance you may need. I apologize once again for the inconvenience caused by this issue and thank you for your patience. Yours sincerely, Tim Quinn Vice President, AfterSales Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Please do not reply to this e-mail. If you have questions, please contact 1-800-PORSCHE. Please read our privacy policy. If you would rather not receive future e-mails from Porsche Cars North America, Inc., please contact 1-800-PORSCHE, or use the manage subscriptions link at bottom. © 2014 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Legal notice www.porscheusa.com.

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Porsche Exclusive showcases custom-order 911 Turbo Cabrio

porsche exclusive 911t cab Porsche Exclusive showcases custom order 911 Turbo Cabrio

Porsche is one of the most profitable automakers in the business. In fact, it’s said to make about $23,000 on each car it sells, thanks in no small part to an options list that can send the sticker price accelerating quicker than one of its own sports cars. But there are always those for whom even the extensive option list won’t be enough, and for just such customers, there is Porsche Exclusive.

The division in Zuffenhausen is tasked with creating even more individualized examples of Porsche vehicles, and it recently did up this 911 Turbo Cabriolet – which, at $160,700, is already one of the most expensive Porsches you can order this side of a 918 Spyder: more than any Boxster, Cayman, Macan or Cayenne, any Panamera other than a Turbo S or Executive – not to mention any other 911 short of a Turbo S.

This particular demo vehicle features a Slate Grey paint job and red interior decked out in more leather than an S&M dungeon – which, come to think of it, would probably be less financially painful than ordering up this car from Porsche Exclusive.

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Investigators blame speed in fatal Paul Walker crash

Cause of Collision that claimed the lives of Paul Walker & Roger Rodas

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s traffic collision experts have determined the speed of the vehicle driven by Roger Rodas, that claimed his life and the life of Paul Walker, was between 80 and 93 Miles Per Hour (MPH) at the time the car impacted a power pole and several trees.

“Investigators determined the cause of the fatal solo-vehicle collision was unsafe speed for the roadway conditions,” said Commander Mike Parker, North (County) Patrol Division, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

An in-depth examination was conducted with the assistance of expert investigators from the California Highway Patrol – Multi-disciplinary Accident Investigation Team (MAIT).

MAIT investigators conducted a mechanical inspection of the 2005 Porsche Carrera GT’s powertrain and exhaust, throttle and fuel system, electrical system, steering and suspension, brake system, tires and wheels, and airbag control modules. The inspection also focused on the Porsche’s history, safety recalls, and repair records.

The mechanical examination revealed no pre-existing conditions that would have caused this collision. “During the examination, it was determined that an aftermarket exhaust system had been installed which would have increased the engine’s horsepower,” said Commander Parker. The tires on the car were more than nine years old.

There is evidence that seatbelts were worn by both Mr. Rodas and Walker and that the airbags deployed for both the driver and passenger. “Toxicology tests on both men revealed that neither had used any alcohol or drugs,” said Commander Parker.

The traffic collision happened at about 3:26PM on Saturday, November 30, 2013, at Hercules St. at Kelly Johnson Pkwy, which is very near the business park at the 28300 block of Rye Canyon Loop, Valencia, in the city of Santa Clarita. The posted speed limit in the area of the collision is 45 MPH.

No eyewitness contacted the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to say there was a second vehicle and there is no evidence to indicate there was a second car involved in the collision. Investigators sought out eyewitnesses to what happened just prior to the collision, as well as to the collision itself. Security videos and photos from local businesses along with other evidence helped skilled investigators to determine the cause of the collision and that no speed contest was taking place.

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s traffic investigators documented the scene extensively after the collision. This included writing a traffic report, photographing the scene, determining the collision’s area of impact and point of rest, measuring skid marks and location of debris, gathering physical evidence such as debris and the on-board car computer data, and examining the car itself to look for such evidence such as paint transfer to help determine whether or not it had impacted other objects or cars.

LA Sheriff’s investigators also consulted with experts from the Porsche and Michelin Corporations as part of the investigation.

The opinion of the Los Angeles County Coroner – Medical Examiner is that Mr. Rodas “died of multiple traumatic injuries. The manner of death is accident.” The opinion of the Los Angeles County Coroner – Medical Examiner is that the cause of death of Mr. Walker is “combined effects of traumatic and thermal injuries. The manner of death is accident.”

Redacted copies of the LASD and CHP traffic collision investigation reports are provided via the hyperlink at the bottom of this message.

The Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station polices the City of Santa Clarita and the unincorporated communities of a portion of the Angeles National Forest, as well as Bouquet Canyon, Canyon County, Castaic, Gorman, Hasley Canyon, Newhall, Neenach, Sand Canyon, Santa Clarita, Saugus, Six Flags Magic Mountain, Sleepy Valley, Southern Oaks, Stevenson Ranch, Sunset Point, Tesoro del Valle, Valencia, Val Verde, West Hills and West Ranch:

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Porsche Acknowledges Findings of Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the California Highway Patrol

Atlanta. We appreciate the meticulous analysis by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the California Highway Patrol. It is a sad day for us whenever anyone is injured in one of our cars, and this was a particularly tragic event. At the same time, the results of the investigation show that, according to all the available evidence, this crash was caused by dangerous driving at speeds much too high for the road in question. There is also evidence that this particular vehicle had been altered from its original design state and had not been maintained properly. However, there is no evidence of any mechanical malfunction. We stand by our Carrera GT and by the investigation and conclusions of the responsible authorities.

About Porsche Cars North America

Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA), based in Atlanta, Ga. is the exclusive U.S. importer of Porsche sports cars, including the Macan and Cayenne SUVs and the Panamera sports sedan. Established in 1984, it is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Porsche AG, which is headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany, and employs approximately 270 people who provide parts, service, marketing and training for 189 dealers. They, in turn, work to provide Porsche customers with a best-in-class experience that is in keeping with the brand’s 66-year history and leadership in the advancement of vehicle performance, safety, and efficiency.

At the core of this success is Porsche’s proud racing heritage that boasts some 30,000 motorsport wins to date.

Source Article from http://www.autoblog.com/2014/03/26/paul-walker-fatal-crash-unsafe-speed-cause/
Investigators blame speed in fatal Paul Walker crash
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