Leno, Seinfeld and a Porsche 356/2 featured in latest CICGC

Jerry Seinfeld and Jay Leno star in the latest episode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee

In the latest kaffeeklatsch known as Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Jerry Seinfeld pulls Jay Leno out of his garage for a trip to Jones Coffee in Pasadena, CA. The NBC funnyman we’ve lately seen driving two guest Porsches in his eponymous garage this time takes the passenger seat in a 1949 Porsche 356/2, one of early all-aluminum, hand-built coupes – still in 100-percent original condition – built in Gmund, Austria and nicknamed “Gmunds.”

The comedy veterans have known one another for 35 years, so the episode is rich with stories of The Good Old Days. Leno says it is also the first time he’s ever had a cup of coffee, and for obvious comedic reasons they start with the civet-stained beans made famous in The Bucket List. You can watch Leno take his first sip below, and have you haven’t heard the joke about the goat and the anvil, scroll on down for a listen to that and one or two more jokes besides.

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Porsche Cayman, Boxster caught in GTS trim

A few months ago, we reported on some leaked information from an internal presentation for upcoming Porsche models. This included details about the Macan and the 911 Targa, which we now know to be true, but there was also talk about GTS versions of the Cayman and Boxster.

Well, it appears we’re now getting our first look at these GTS models, as our spy photographers have just snapped a pair of Porsche prototypes out testing – one Cayman and one Boxster.

Right off the bat, we can see that both GTS-branded cars will get a slightly tweaked exterior with new fascias (bringing LED daytime running lights to the Cayman) and air diffusers at the rear. The true gem of these cars will be the added horsepower to the tune of 340 horsepower – a 15-hp bump. A manual transmission will likely be standard, as will Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM).

The original leaked information said both cars will debut in April at the Beijing Motor Show before going on sale in June. Prices for both should start around $75,000.

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Porsche Cayman, Boxster caught in GTS trim
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Inside Porsche’s secret museum warehouse


Clashing patched tile and concrete flooring, mismatched opaque windows, exposed fire suppression systems and heavy-duty industrial shelving is immaterial when you consider that the warehouse is simply a constantly changing holding area for Porsche’s retired racecars, show concepts, development mules, prototypes and engineering displays. All told, there are currently 518 vehicles in the museum’s collection, but the polished public facility only has room to properly display 85 at any one time. With the exception of the approximately 100 or so vehicles scattered around the world (e.g., special exhibitions, historic races and undergoing restoration), the balance of the collection is stored in the warehouse. My guide said that there were 336 models currently in the building.

Most of the vehicles are in running condition, topped-off with vital fluids and with their batteries kept optimized.

Stepping from a bright and sunny crisp winter afternoon into the naturally lit warehouse was a bit surreal. Various Porsche models, some covered and others not (but none appeared dusty), stretched in all directions. The facility was spotlessly clean, but there was an overpowering smell of used motor oil, rubber and fuel. I questioned a curator and he disclosed that most of the vehicles are in running condition, topped-off with vital fluids and with their batteries kept optimized on a large rack of trickle-chargers.

The variety was astounding; the haphazard placements parked 200-mph GT1 LeMans winners directly across from field tractors and salvaged Rothman 959 shells next to 986 Boxster show displays. There were 924 models stacked three high in the center of the room, and an orange 934 blocking another aisle. A full-size “Sally” mock-up, built on a chopped 2002 996 for Disney-Pixar’s “Cars” movie, sat smiling in one room.


Pulling back a cover revealed the original 959 “Gruppe B” Concept.

While each and every vehicle (whole or part) told a story, there were some that really caught my eye.

Pulling back a cover revealed the original 959 “Gruppe B” Concept (below left), which was unveiled at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show (I actually had a picture of it on my bedroom wall). With the exception of a temporary gold BBS rear wheels, the pearly white car appeared nearly unchanged more than three decades later. It is interesting to note that the show car is missing the tell-tale air vents in front of the front wheels, and the engine intake scoops just aft of the doors, which later distinguished the low-volume production supercar from its standard siblings.

High upon a rack, below the exposed driveline of a 911 Turbo, was the bodytub of a Volkswagen “Schwimmwagen” (below right). The World War Two amphibious vehicle was based on the civilian Volkswagen Beetle. In fighting trim, the four-wheel-drive vehicle was powered by a four-cylinder engine rated at just 25 horsepower. While it had a retractable screw propeller for water use, the front wheels doubled as rudders, which must have made turning an interesting maneuver. Of the 15,584 examples made during the War, just 1,308 were made by Porsche.


This heavily disguised and completely badge-free prototype gave no hint of what was shoehorned in its tail.

?I found an early predecessor to the Panamera under a rack. The silver four-door 989 Concept was designed in 1988. Face-to-face, the vehicle looked like an awkwardly stretched 996 model (even though that particular model was still a decade in the future). While it appeared to hide an engine under the long rear decklid, the concept was fitted with a front-mounted, water-cooled V8 that was likely borrowed from the 928 of the same era. Slumping sales of the 928 killed the 989 program in the early 1990s, and we had to wait more than another decade for the arrival of Porsche’s first four-door sedan.

My favorite hidden jewel was a matte black hybrid mix of a 993 and a 959, which I spied hidden under a tarp (below left). At first I figured it was some sort of 959 mule, which really sparked my curiosity, but its front clip was too new. I asked a curator who smiled as he opened its rear decklid to reveal a 3.6-liter V8 sourced from a first-generation Audi V8 (below right). Even in the face of those countless rumors of an upcoming V8-powered 911 model that started decades ago, this heavily disguised and completely badge-free prototype gave no hint of what was shoehorned in its tail. (There were two more of the “these-are-not-what-they-appear” vehicles in storage, but we’ll post those up on Facebook over the next few days to see if anyone can guess what they really are.)

Even after a couple of hours roaming, I left feeling as if I had only scratched the surface of what’s inside the building. I’d estimate that maybe half of the collection is exposed, but there are countless gems hidden beneath each of the cloth car covers that I never had the opportunity to peel back and even view. I need another tour – lasting about a week, next time.

If you have any questions about a particular vehicle in our high-res gallery, please ask in our comments section and we’ll do our best to answer.

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Le Mans-winning Porsche 935 K3 ‘seized’ by DEA agents

Porsche 935 K3 being seized by DEA agents

Porsche has won Le Mans more than any other marque, but only one of those overall race winners was actually based on a 911. That was the 1979 Porsche 935 K3, chassis number 009 00015 that was entered by brothers Don and Bill Whittington. It went on to win at the Nürburgring and Watkins Glen, and scored podium finishes at Sebring and Brands Hatch as well. In short, it’s a historically significant and hugely valuable piece of motorsport history. And it was just seized by the DEA. Sorta.

After the Whittington brothers ran afoul of a handful of lawsuits and were implicated in smuggling narcotics, the car changed hands a few times before ending up in the noted collection of one Bruce Meyers. He had it at Laguna Seca earlier this month when a black Suburban, Dodge Charger and transporter truck pulled up with government plates, asked to speak with Meyer, presented him with a court order, loaded the car onto the truck and drove off.

Though familiar with the legal disputes surrounding the ownership of the car and the misdeeds of its famous original owners, Meyer was left understandably distraught over the events that had just unfolded in front of him to separate him from his pride and joy. (Or one of them, anyway; Bruce has got an eminently desirable collection of classic cars.) But here’s the kicker: those DEA agents weren’t actual DEA agents. Fortunately they weren’t thieves, either. The actual story could have been the plot right out of Ocean’s 14 if they ever made one and it focused on classic cars. (Is anyone in Hollywood listening?)

Read the full account at Sports Car Digest and view the images of the car in the gallery above.

Related Gallery1979 Porsche 935 K3
1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3 1979 Porsche 935 K3

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There’s a Porsche Cayman under here somewhere

Royal Customs Alphan One concept, front three-quarter view

What we have here is the work of Dubai tuner Royal Customs that is controversial even beyond its styling. The Middle East aftermarket house says it spent fourteen months developing a bodykit for the Porsche Cayman, and the results seem to be aimed at those who wish their coupe were a 918 Spyder – the nose, strake-filled and widened rear fender, carbon fiber wing and massive diffuser all cribbing some from Stuttgart’s new hybrid supercar.

Even without a buyer, the Alpha One Concept is already controversial. When WorldCarFans posted on the Royal Customs car recently, German tuner Alpha-N Performance wrote in alleging that the Dubai package copies their design from two years ago, which was also called the Alpha One, a design with which it’s clear the Dubai Alpha One shares numerous cues. We asked Royal Customs about its relationship to the Alpha One car, we were told, “Yes, there is a lot we can say about the remarkable similarities all of which will be explained by our press release by Mr. Emil from Autogespot. Please wait for the official release and you will have the full exciting story. It’s an ‘actual success story’ and not a ‘replication’ story.”

The response is referring to an “extensive report” on the car coming out of Autogespot. Royal Customs doesn’t have the Alpha One Concept on its site yet, so we’re still missing quite a few details on it, such as whether the Porsche engine has been given a similarly 918-ish workover. We do know that the company says each car takes 30 days to build and it will only build three of them, which is a number that should satisfy any haters and, even more so, its buyers. You can decide which side of the fence you’re on by having a close look at it in the gallery above.

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