Xcar sends off the Bugatti Veyron

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We drive the cars of Furious 7… in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

On March 27, Turn 10 Studios, the folks behind the Forza Motorsport series, and Universal Pictures, the studio responsible for the Fast and Furious franchise, gave us a match made in heaven, announcing a “standalone expansion” featuring the two franchises. Called Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast and Furious, it features the cars from the latest film installment, unique missions and the voice-acting of Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, who plays tech guru Tej Parker on camera. A Fast and Furious video game? Seems like a no brainer.

It gets better. Rather than limiting the Fast and Furious Edition cars to the expansion game, Turn 10 made them available through one of their (some may say notorious) downloadable content packages. Eight of the expansion’s 11 cars were made available for just $4.99 (the only cars that weren’t included were the Fast and Furious Edition Nissan GT-R, while the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport and McLaren P1 are already available in-game).

What’s cool ais that the cars featured in both games are visually identical to the vehicles driven by the stars of Furious 7. Each in-game car has an on-screen parallel that plays a role in advancing the film’s story. Considering that we’re unlikely to score seat time in Dominic Toretto’s real Dodge Charger, then, we figured we’d take to the game and test the car in the digital realm. We’ve got nine little cluster reviews, covering the cars both in the game and how they appear in the movies. And don’t worry, there are no major spoilers here.

Click on for the cars of Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast and Furious.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 03 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

1970 Dodge Charger R/T Fast and Furious Edition
Supercharged 7.2L V8 / 900 HP / 663 LB-FT

The one vehicle that is mandatory in a Fast and Furious video game, Dom’s hot-rodded 1970 Dodge Charger, is as much a character in the films as its driver. Furious 7 marks the fourth appearance of this Mopar beast in the series. Not surprisingly it’s a handful to drive, wildly quick and with a four-speed transmission packed full of very tall gears. But beyond that, it’s arguably the coolest of the FF Edition cars.

This black beauty is exactly as it appears in the latest installment of the film, with the video game version featuring intricate little details, like the moving parts on the BDS supercharger. It’s an iconic car, and it’s treated as such in the game.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 12 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

1970 Plymouth Cuda Fast and Furious Edition
5.6L V8 / 717 HP / 656 LB-FT

Featured from the opening credits and in the final action sequence of Furious 7, the menacing black AAR Cuda is Letty’s vehicle of choice. Among the classic Mopars in Forza Horizon, the Plymouth sits between the agile Road Runner and Dom’s brutally fast Charger. It’s probably the coolest looking classic in game, featuring a contrasting gloss-matte black color scheme and the prominent AAR logo on its rear fender.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 07 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

2013 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Fast and Furious Edition
3.6L V6 / 570 HP / 837 LB-FT

Neither particularly fast nor particularly furious (despite it’s claimed 837 pound-feet of all-American torque), this heavily modified, armored Wrangler is helmed by Tej in one of Furious 7‘s first big actions scenes. It certainly has presence, with hardcore body mods, bigger wheels and a beefed up suspension that makes tackling the rougher, tougher parts of the FH2 map easier. Still, and much like the real-life Jeep, the movie version is hilariously devoid of feedback and suspension manners.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 11 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

2014 Maserati Ghibli S Fast and Furious Edition
Twin-turbocharged 3.0L V6 / 618 HP / 619 LB-Ft

The whole premise of Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast and Furious is to secure cars for Dom, Brian and the crew to use on screen. So we found it strange that we were being asked to score the “bad guy” Maserati Ghibli sedan piloted by Jason Statham’s villainous Deckard Shaw. It seems that the video game mirrors the movie series’ penchant for plot holes.

On the big screen the Maserati stars opposite the Road Runner in a scene featuring both Toretto and Shaw, and reveals that there’s more to its driver than what’s on the surface. In game, it’s wickedly quick and sounds absolutely delicious, providing a sharp, neutral handling character that’s easy to fling about.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 13 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

1970 Plymouth Road Runner Fast and Furious Edition
7.2L V8 / 670 HP / 600 LB-FT

Driven briefly by Dom in Furious 7, this handsome orange Road Runner arrives in Forza Horizon 2 with a 440-cubic-inch V8 and surprisingly light, agile handling. Road Runners have featured in a number of FF films, but its appearance in the seventh installment might be its most high profile. As for its fate in the film, we’ll just say its ironic considering the car’s name.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 02 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

2015 Dodge Charger R/T Fast and Furious Edition
5.7L V8 / 520 HP / 578 LB-FT

One of the more obvious pieces of product placement in Furious 7, this red Dodge appears with Dom driving in a scene where the rest of the team pilots cars like the McLaren 12C, Bugatti Veyron Super Sport, Ferrari 458 Italia and SRT Viper. In the game, it’s a lightly modified example of the 5.7-liter R/T model. It’s a weird inclusion in the game, too, considering it has approximately 30 seconds of screen time.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 01 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

2015 Dodge Challenger Fast and Furious Edition
5.7L V8 / 520 HP / 578 LB-FT

One of the most prominent cars in the Furious 7 trailers, this rally-raid-ready Challenger features in the first big action sequence, and does everything from parachute out of a plane to rescue Brian O’Connor from a bus that’s about to fall off a cliff. In short, it’s a huge part of the film’s first big set piece. In the game, it’s an entertaining way of bombing cross-country, and thanks to its Sublime Green paint and many body mods, it sticks out while doing so.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 14 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

1998 Toyota Supra Fast and Furious Edition
Twin-turbocharged 3.0L I6 / 675 HP / 497 LB-FT

If you’ve watched Wiz Khalifa’s music video for the song See You Again, which features in the final scene of Furious 7, you’ve seen this white Supra. Piloted by Brian O’Connor, it signals his exit from the franchise (following Paul Walker’s death) in a tear-jerking sequence alongside Dominic Toretto. While O’Connor piloted an orange Toyota in the original The Fast and The Furious, he proved to be a big Nissan Skyline/GT-R fan in the sequels, which makes the Supra’s appearance in the memorial a bit odd.
That aside, the Supra’s appearance in the game is a notable link between the modern Fast and Furious franchise and its import-heavy roots. This is the free car in the FF car pack.

forza horizon 2 fast furious 09 We drive the cars of Furious 7... in Forza Horizon 2 [w/video]

2015 Nissan GT-R Fast and Furious Edition
Twin-turbocharged 3.8L V6 / NA / NA

While not part of the Fast and Furious car pack, Brian’s modded Nissan is easily the most potent vehicle in the standalone expansion. It plays a major role in the final action set piece of the film, and takes part in some ridiculous stunt sequences.

In the game, it’s sharper than just about everything else. This the vehicle you’ll turn to when you absolutely need to get through a mission. We’ll admit, we’re disappointed this isn’t available as part of the FF car pack.

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Bugatti Veyron La Finale gets a video farewell

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Bugatti Veyron Vitesse La Finale bids us adieu [w/video]

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Bugatti Veyron bids adieu with the ?Grand Sport Vitesse La Finale [w/video]

Geneva International Motor Show 2015: Bugatti celebrates the Veyron World première of the 450th and final Veyron, the Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”

? Bugatti President Wolfgang Dürheimer: “As the most powerful and fastest
production supercar in the world, the Veyron is the benchmark”

? All 450 Veyrons have been sold, marking an important milestone for
Bugatti

? The first and 450th Veyron will be on display together at the Geneva International Motor Show

Molsheim/Geneva, 2 March 2015. The curtain rises on an icon! At the Geneva International Motor Show, Bugatti is celebrating the Veyron, the fastest production supercar in the world whose performance has captivated legions of fans around the world since its launch ten years ago. The Veyron is limited to 450 units, which have now all been sold. The world première of the final Veyron in Geneva will mark the culmination of an unprecedented chapter in automotive history. Bugatti will showcase the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale” with chassis number 450 alongside chassis number one of the Veyron 16.4 which rolled out of the company’s factory in Molsheim ten years ago and heralded the start of the Veyron’s success story.

“The Bugatti Veyron has shown that our engineers are capable of achieving a previously unimagined level of technical excellence, thereby opening up whole new dimensions in the automotive sector,” says Wolfgang Dürheimer, President of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S. “The Veyron is justifiably at the head of the field.”

“As the most powerful and fastest production supercar in the world, the Veyron is a true benchmark,” continues Dürheimer. “With a world record speed of 431.072 km/h, it has become an icon of longitudinal dynamics.”

The development of the Bugatti Veyron represented one of the greatest technical and engineering challenges ever overcome in the automotive history. At the time, Bugatti developers were faced with four key specifications: the car had to transfer more than 1,000 PS onto the road, achieve a top speed in excess of 400 km/h, accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in less than three seconds and – the biggest challenge of all – still be suitable for ‘driving to the opera’ in comfort and style.

In addition to its stunning performance, it is this everyday practicality and suitability for comfortable, luxurious travel which makes the Veyron so unique, and which sets it apart from all other supercars and hyper cars on the market.

This combination has proven to be a recipe for success. All of the planned 450 vehicles have now been sold: 300 coupés and 150 open-top super sports cars.

“So far no other carmaker has managed to successfully market a product that stands for unique top-class technical performance and pure luxury in a comparable price/volume range,” says Wolfgang Dürheimer. “This is an incredible success for Bugatti.”

Not only is the Veyron the epitome of premium performance and speed, it is also a prime example of timeless automotive design. The Veyron is an automotive piece of art featuring unique lines that are heavily influenced by the traditional design DNA of the Bugatti brand.

“The Veyron is a showcase for technology, design and art – in keeping with the Bugatti brand’s values of ‘Art, Forme, Technique’”, Dürheimer says. Bugatti’s customers are as unique as its vehicles. “The Veyron has created an entirely new customer base for an automotive brand.”

“Alongside the certainty of owning the world’s fastest production sports car with a high degree of individual exclusivity, Bugatti customers appreciate that, by purchasing a Veyron, they become part of the history of an automobile brand that is steeped in tradition,” says the Bugatti President. “Many vehicles therefore find their way into private collections and are purchased as an investment by automotive connoisseurs.”

When it came to equipping the 450 Veyron sports cars, Bugatti did everything to fulfil customers’ wishes. For example, the body finish featuring clear-lacquered exposed carbon fibre was particularly popular. Bugatti currently supplies this finish in eight colours – more than any other manufacturer and in a quality that no other company can achieve. In addition, the French luxury brand offers over 100 different colours for the painted finishes on the carbon fibre bodies. The vehicles also feature a wide range of luxurious materials that were uncommon in the automotive field, such as porcelain, crystal, special types of leather and wood, gold and platinum. Each Bugatti configured by a customer is unique. Including options, the average price of the vehicles recently sold is €2.3 million.

It goes without saying that Bugatti is already working on the sequel to its recent success story, with development of its next model well underway. “With the next Bugatti model, we are aiming to consolidate and expand the market-leading position we have established with the Veyron,” the Bugatti President explains. “Our challenge is to make the best even better.”

The 450th Veyron: Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”

The last of the 450 Veyron supercars is the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”. It draws its sheer force from a 1,200 PS, 8-litre, W16 engine which provides a breathtaking maximum torque of 1,500 Nm. It sprints from zero to 100 km/h in just 2.6 seconds and can achieve a top speed of 410 km/h.

The “La Finale” design is a modern homage to chassis number 1

“When designing the “La Finale”, the designers sought inspiration from the first Veyron in order to provide a visual conclusion to the success story of this super sports car,” says Bugatti’s chief designer Achim Anscheidt. “Although both vehicles have a black and red colour scheme, chassis numbers one and 450 still have their own individual character which we have identified visually. Ultimately, every Veyron is unique.” The owner of the Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale” also had a say in the design of the vehicle.

Première for red exposed carbon fibre

The design of the carbon bodywork of “La Finale” is based on chassis number one which was designed ten years ago in the traditional Bugatti two-tone colour scheme, which was popular in Bugatti models of the 1920s and 1930s. This striking design language remains inseparable from the Veyron to this day. For the “La Finale”, the front wing panels, the doors and the areas between the doors and the side air intakes, known as “medallions” in French, are made from black exposed carbon fibre. The other parts of the outer shell are made from red exposed carbon fibre, the first time this colour has ever been used on a vehicle. Including this new colour, Bugatti now offers a total of eight different tints for exposed carbon fibre. The French luxury brand is an industry leader in terms of not only the diversity of the colour schemes it offers, but also in relation to the quality and processing of the exposed carbon fibre.

Unusually for a Veyron, the name of the Grand Sport Vitesse has been incorporated into the outer shell. The “La Finale” lettering, which highlights the extra significance of this particular super sports car, appears twice: once very clearly under the right front headlight and then in a slightly concealed position on the underside of the rear wing. In both cases, the bright “Italian Red” lettering is painted into the black exposed carbon fibre.

For the first time in a Veyron, the air scoops and intercooler cover have been painted black. The EB logo and the relief “16.4″ have also been emblazoned on it in Italian Red.

The wheel design is also in keeping with the red and black colour scheme. It is worth mentioning the hubcaps that were milled from a single block of aluminium – another example of the tremendous lengths that Bugatti goes to in the production of its vehicles. And that’s not all: each hubcap features a relief of the famous Bugatti elephant that was created during the milling process and then painted black. Rembrandt Bugatti, renowned sculptor and brother of company founder Ettore, designed this figure which was later used as a radiator cap on the Type 41 Royale and subsequently became a symbol of the brand. The elephant can also be found on the red fuel tank cover and oil cap as a black anodised insert made from milled aluminium.

An interior of strong, sophisticated contrasts

As with the exterior, the interior of the “La Finale” also pays tribute to the first Veyron. It was upholstered entirely in leather in a light beige colour known as “Silk”. Leather also adds a refined touch to the interior of the “La Finale”, where it features in the centre seat panels, the footwell, the headliner, the cowling and the rear wall. Unlike chassis number one, the designers and the customer have settled on contrasting colours for chassis number 450, selecting a striking red tone known as “Hot Spur”. This red appears in the arm rests, the instrument panel, the dashboard, the side bolsters and on the steering wheel rim, which is also decorated with stitching in “Silk” beige.

Red exposed carbon fibre is also used in the interior: on the centre tunnel, on the inserts in the centre console, on the door panels and seat shells.

The red head restraints are adorned with “La Finale” lettering embroidered in “Silk” colour. The lettering is found again in “Italian Red” in the door sill strips, etched into the black exposed carbon fibre.

The jewel in the interior is undoubtedly the Bugatti elephant on the stowage compartment cover made from red exposed carbon fibre and located in the rear panel between the seats. The elephant was cast in bronze with great technical skill, given a black patina, and then worked into the cover as an insert. The lettering “450/450″ has been painted in black under the bronze cast.

The Geneva International Motor Show will be staged from 5 to 15 March 2015 at the Palexpo exhibition centre in Geneva. The Bugatti exhibit is in hall 1.

The impossible made possible

The Bugatti Veyron – a technical masterpiece

When the Bugatti Veyron was first announced at the end of the nineties, many people were sceptical that the basic parameters could ever work. With more than 1,000 PS, a top speed in excess of 400 km/h, acceleration from nought to one hundred in less than three seconds, the doubters thought it simply impossible to produce a super sports car with this level of performance while remaining controllable and drivable. But that’s not all. Bugatti had set the bar even higher with its intention to produce a comfortable road car that was suitable for everyday use.

The development of the Veyron was one of the most significant technical challenges ever undertaken by the automotive industry. Bugatti engineers had to push the limits of physics and do things that had never been done before in automotive development.

Structure and materials. Very few parts, components or systems from existing vehicle concepts could be used in the Veyron. Everything had to be developed from scratch to achieve the required performance before being incorporated into the vehicle. When creating the Veyron, designers regularly drew inspiration from other industries which required extreme speeds and demanded extreme stress loads from materials and systems.

One key objective in the development of this exceptional vehicle was to achieve maximum longitudinal and lateral dynamics combined with optimum safety for the driver and front passenger. To do so, the Bugatti development team came up with a winning combination of rigidity and lightweight construction for use in the fastest roadster in the world.

Bugatti selected materials with optimum characteristics for each area of the Veyron, designed specifically to cope with the relevant loads. Criteria included lightness, tensile strength, formability, heat resistance, and non-splintering.

The passenger compartment of the Veyron consists of extremely strong yet feather-light carbon fibre. Like a Formula 1 racing car, it is designed as a monocoque and weighs around 110 pounds. The rear of the monocoque contains a cavity modelled to house the 100-litre fuel tank. This central vehicle structure is completed by a fixed, highly complex frame structure at the front and rear. The torsional rigidity from axis to axis is approximately 45,000 Nm per degree, almost double that found in modern production sports cars. This excellent structural rigidity ensures extremely precise driving performance in bends, with excellent stability under braking and acceleration.

The engine and gearbox assembly and the supporting frame for the rear of the vehicle are mounted with carbon fibre brackets manufactured using a resin infiltration process. These components must endure continuous temperatures of up to 170 degrees due to their proximity to the exhaust system and turbochargers. Bugatti developed these new heat-resistant materials and production methods especially for the Veyron and thus for the automotive industry. Both have since found their way into the aviation industry.

The front end of the Veyron is firmly connected to the front of the monocoque and consists of a 34 kg lightweight aluminium frame structure which essentially performs two functions. Firstly, it holds the front end components including the front axle differential, the cooling packages, steering system and the battery. Secondly, the front end also acts as a crash structure that is designed to deform and absorb kinetic energy in the event of an accident.

Torsion-resistant and lightweight upper longitudinal members made from carbon fibre are mounted at the rear of the monocoque. A carbon fibre cross member bolted to the two longitudinal members forms the rear end of the frame structure.

Titanium was the first choice for the bolts used to connect the three parts of the vehicle – the front end, monocoque and rear chassis. The advantage of titanium bolts over steel screw bolts is that they provide maximum strength but weigh less, a feature that Bugatti drew from the aviation industry. The Veyron was the first production car in the automotive industry to use titanium bolts. It was also Bugatti that subjected these bolts to continuous load testing to ensure that they could be used in a vehicle.

Carbon fibre plays an important role in the Veyron due to its properties, which have been developed to withstand extreme loads, but also for aesthetic reasons. Bugatti is the market leader in exposed carbon fibre. No other manufacturer in the automotive industry manages to produce exposed carbon fibre of such immaculate quality. Material authenticity is the defining principle – everything is genuine, there is no overlamination. The carbon mats are grouped and superimposed by hand and with a keen eye for precision to ensure perfect, symmetrical alignment of the fibres on the vehicle body and other components. Up to twelve layers of lacquer and paint are then applied by hand, resulting in clear-coated carbon fibre with unparalleled colour depth and brilliance. Bugatti currently offers eight colours: blue, grey, black, green, brown, purple, turquoise, and now also red. No other manufacturer offers this range of colours. Exposed carbon fibre has since become an extremely popular option amongst Bugatti customers. Bugatti has also transferred this expertise to other Group brands for small series vehicles and certain customised options.

Engine. The heart and soul of the Veyron is the 8-litre W16 engine with four turbochargers, which initially generated 1,001 PS, and an incredible 1,200 PS in later models. The 16-cylinder mid-engine is 710 mm in length, no longer than a conventional V12 engine, and weighs just 490 kg due to its lightweight construction, despite its output. The engine is fully capable of operating under a continuous full load, a feat that engines designed for use in motor racing cannot achieve.

Its compact dimensions are due to the unique arrangement of its cylinder banks in a W configuration. Two VR8 blocks, each with a 15-degree bank angle, are joined in the crankcase to form one engine. Both eight cylinders are set at an angle of 90 degrees to each other and are aspirated by a total of four exhaust gas turbochargers.

The Bugatti development team created a hugely complex drive unit in order to convert the power output of the 64-valve engine into driving dynamics suitable for both everyday traffic and the race track. If the extreme engine power alone is an ingenious masterpiece, transferring it to the road was an equally demanding challenge.

Development work focussed on the engine’s extremely high performance, in addition to its unique compact nature. Lightweight materials are used that not only result in a low power-to- weight ratio, but also provide a spontaneous response from the moving masses inside the engine. In addition to titanium piston rods, known as “easy runners”, the eight-stage oil pump integrated into the crankcase for dry sump lubrication has light aluminium gears. Only a small mass flywheel is required as the layout of the 16-cylinder engine already ensures smooth running. The use of motor sport technology is evident not only in the plasma-coated cylinder running faces, but also in the use of high-strength steel for the shafts and gears in the aluminium crankcase.

Gearbox. The Veyron is equipped with the dual-clutch gearbox (DSG), which is the fastest gearbox in the world. Bugatti was the first manufacturer to use a seven-speed variant of the DSG. Designed specially for the new sports car, this gearbox has a job which any other gearbox would baulk at, i.e. to transfer engine torque of up to 1,500 Nm to the road surface.

At the time, the dual-clutch transmission used in the Veyron was a unique combination of the dynamic advantages of a manual gearbox with the convenience functions of automatic transmission. When it was developed, no other manufacturer outside of Volkswagen AG was using comparable gearbox technology.
Adaptive boost-pressure fuel injection. In a high-performance vehicle such as the Veyron, it is essential that the engine is always supplied with constant fuel pressure. This also required a new development, and so Bugatti invented three-phase injection pumps which, unlike conventional plus/minus polarised pumps, are able to supply the engine with the required amounts of fuel continuously at a constant pressure.

The fuel tank also had to be redesigned. Bugatti turned to the world of motorsport but had to rebuild the conventional fuel tank used in racing, which is not permitted for road vehicles, to ensure that it would be approved. Bugatti consulted engineers in the aerospace industry, and the outcome was a fuel tank with an external Teflon coating which provides the fuel pump with a constant supply of fuel in every situation, up to a residual capacity of three litres and maximum lateral acceleration of 1.4 g.

Cooling. Cooling is an extremely important aspect of the Veyron. Sophisticated airflow patterns were devised to conduct sufficient cooling air to the vehicle’s radiators and extract hot air without compromising the vehicle design – a key consideration.

During combustion, some 2,400 PS of additional heat is generated for every 1,200 PS of drive power. To cope with this, the Bugatti engine has two water circuits. The larger circuit contains 40 litres of coolant water in three coolers in the front section of the vehicle to keep the engine at operating temperature. The second, a low-temperature circuit with a separate water pump, contains 20 litres of coolant water. This system cools the charged air and helps to prevent the car from overheating in slow traffic, which is a common problem in high-performance sports cars.

Tyres. For the Veyron, Bugatti worked in partnership with Michelin to develop the world’s first mass-produced tyre that can withstand speeds in the region of 400 km/h. The production tyres can be used in all speed ranges, which means that the Veyron does not require a different set of tyres when being driven at maximum speed. This was an important criterion which the developers had to fulfill in relation to the vehicle’s everyday practicality.

One exciting detail of tyre development is the new tyre pressure sensor that had to be developed for the Veyron. Centrifugal forces of up to 130 kg are generated at speeds in excess of 400 km/h. This required extensive tests on a test stand used for aircraft gas turbines in order to simulate the high speeds of the Veyron wheels. At the time, this kind of system was not available in the automotive industry.

Brakes. Bugatti developed a high-performance braking system featuring unique components in order to control powerful forces effectively and bring the vehicle to a halt safely and quickly. Certain components were designed in conjunction with development partners from the aerospace industry.

Experiencing the Bugatti’s braking system in action is just as much of a thrill as the acceleration. Combined with the simultaneous application of the air brake, an aerodynamic braking function integrated into the rear wing, the Veyron generates deceleration values not encountered in any other production car.

The braking forces are distributed to a maximum of sixty percent on the front axle and forty percent to the rear axle.

Bugatti chose carbon-ceramic brake discs as the preferred material, the first time a company in the Volkswagen Group had done so, in order to achieve maximum braking performance and to withstand brake disc surface temperatures of 1,000 degrees. The relatively low material weight also greatly reduces unwanted impact on the steering. Titanium was used for the brake disc hub instead of the usual stainless steel. As a result, the Veyron had by far the strongest braking performance in the automotive industry and motorsport at the time.

The carbon disc brakes at the front are 400 millimetres in diameter (rear: 380 mm). An extremely rigid eight-piston monoblock caliper unit with four pads each, reinforced with a central bar and weighing just 5.7 kg, is used.

Variable aerodynamics. The Veyron’s design is an outstanding feature, which clearly sets the super sports car apart from other high-performance vehicles in the automotive industry. The shape and style of the Veyron are strongly based on the historical design DNA of the brand.

The strict requirement to stick to the design of the car did not always make life easy for the developers, and this was also the case in relation to the aerodynamics, which are clearly an essential element of a supercar.

The most important technical element on the Veyron, which solves the contradiction between design and aerodynamics, is the rear wing. At speeds above 200 km/h it provides additional optimisation of braking performance. The wing flips up to an angle of 55 degrees in less than 0.4 seconds, with important consequences. Firstly, it increases the rear downforce, thereby improving the distribution of braking power between the front and rear axles. Secondly, it increases the air resistance, as when an aircraft is landing. At high speeds, the air brake alone causes deceleration of up to 0.6 g. It is activated via the brake pressure. With standard tyres on appropriate road surfaces, the wheel brakes generate deceleration values of around 1.4 g. The Veyron can brake to a complete standstill from 400 km/h in under ten seconds.

Never before in automotive history did engineers have to set up a sports car for use on public roads, while being capable of the same ease and security of handling across such a wide range of speeds. The Bugatti team faced a major challenge when it came to maintaining a balance between what amounted to three aerodynamic requirement profiles. Firstly, the bodywork had to have minimum air resistance to ensure that it could still achieve extreme acceleration values in excess of 200 km/h and reach a maximum speed of more than 400 km/h. Secondly, the downforce conditions on the front and rear axles over the entire speed range had to be so sophisticated that the fastest production super car in the world would be as smooth as possible on the road. And thirdly, it was expected that all the extremely tightly-packed high-performance cooling units under the outer shell would be supplied with optimum airflow at all times.

The aerodynamic management of the Veyron is a fascinating high-tech solution that is unparalleled in contemporary automotive engineering. A computer-controlled central hydraulic system is the heart of the regulatory framework. It regulates the ground clearance of the all- wheel drive Veyron, using three speed-dependent levels. A front diffuser flap is installed on both sides of the underbody to increase the downforce. Both of these flaps open and close with the help of two hydraulic cylinders. The downforce at the rear is regulated by a diffuser in the underbody and by the rear spoiler.

Verdict. The Veyron’s incredible performance statistics have powered the automotive industry into new dimensions. In the process, Bugatti developed completely new technical solutions, some of which have found their way into other brands within the Group and beyond, and have even been used in other industries.

The Veyron is the first and only super sports car designed and built to handle any driving situation at any time in its production configuration. Where other super sports cars and hyper cars require special preparation for individual driving situations, the Veyron automatically adjusts its settings at lightning speed without any input from the driver. It can set itself up for maximum acceleration on long straights, twisty country roads or city traffic, ensuring that the Veyron always has an optimum setup to provide a comfortable ride.

The Veyron 16.4 was launched in 2005 and provided impressive evidence of just what Bugatti developers had achieved. This marked the beginning of a great success story, which continued in 2008 with the launch of the open version – the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport with 1,001 PS. In 2010, the Veyron 16.4 Super Sport with increased power of 1,200 PS was launched and was then joined by the roadster version, the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse, in 2012.

Source Article from http://www.autoblog.com/2015/03/02/bugatti-veyron-grand-sport-vitesse-la-final-geneva-2015/
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Bugatti Veyron bids adieu with the ?Grand Sport Vitesse La Finale

Geneva International Motor Show 2015: Bugatti celebrates the Veyron World première of the 450th and final Veyron, the Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”

? Bugatti President Wolfgang Dürheimer: “As the most powerful and fastest
production supercar in the world, the Veyron is the benchmark”

? All 450 Veyrons have been sold, marking an important milestone for
Bugatti

? The first and 450th Veyron will be on display together at the Geneva International Motor Show

Molsheim/Geneva, 2 March 2015. The curtain rises on an icon! At the Geneva International Motor Show, Bugatti is celebrating the Veyron, the fastest production supercar in the world whose performance has captivated legions of fans around the world since its launch ten years ago. The Veyron is limited to 450 units, which have now all been sold. The world première of the final Veyron in Geneva will mark the culmination of an unprecedented chapter in automotive history. Bugatti will showcase the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale” with chassis number 450 alongside chassis number one of the Veyron 16.4 which rolled out of the company’s factory in Molsheim ten years ago and heralded the start of the Veyron’s success story.

“The Bugatti Veyron has shown that our engineers are capable of achieving a previously unimagined level of technical excellence, thereby opening up whole new dimensions in the automotive sector,” says Wolfgang Dürheimer, President of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S. “The Veyron is justifiably at the head of the field.”

“As the most powerful and fastest production supercar in the world, the Veyron is a true benchmark,” continues Dürheimer. “With a world record speed of 431.072 km/h, it has become an icon of longitudinal dynamics.”

The development of the Bugatti Veyron represented one of the greatest technical and engineering challenges ever overcome in the automotive history. At the time, Bugatti developers were faced with four key specifications: the car had to transfer more than 1,000 PS onto the road, achieve a top speed in excess of 400 km/h, accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in less than three seconds and – the biggest challenge of all – still be suitable for ‘driving to the opera’ in comfort and style.

In addition to its stunning performance, it is this everyday practicality and suitability for comfortable, luxurious travel which makes the Veyron so unique, and which sets it apart from all other supercars and hyper cars on the market.

This combination has proven to be a recipe for success. All of the planned 450 vehicles have now been sold: 300 coupés and 150 open-top super sports cars.

“So far no other carmaker has managed to successfully market a product that stands for unique top-class technical performance and pure luxury in a comparable price/volume range,” says Wolfgang Dürheimer. “This is an incredible success for Bugatti.”

Not only is the Veyron the epitome of premium performance and speed, it is also a prime example of timeless automotive design. The Veyron is an automotive piece of art featuring unique lines that are heavily influenced by the traditional design DNA of the Bugatti brand.

“The Veyron is a showcase for technology, design and art – in keeping with the Bugatti brand’s values of ‘Art, Forme, Technique’”, Dürheimer says. Bugatti’s customers are as unique as its vehicles. “The Veyron has created an entirely new customer base for an automotive brand.”

“Alongside the certainty of owning the world’s fastest production sports car with a high degree of individual exclusivity, Bugatti customers appreciate that, by purchasing a Veyron, they become part of the history of an automobile brand that is steeped in tradition,” says the Bugatti President. “Many vehicles therefore find their way into private collections and are purchased as an investment by automotive connoisseurs.”

When it came to equipping the 450 Veyron sports cars, Bugatti did everything to fulfil customers’ wishes. For example, the body finish featuring clear-lacquered exposed carbon fibre was particularly popular. Bugatti currently supplies this finish in eight colours – more than any other manufacturer and in a quality that no other company can achieve. In addition, the French luxury brand offers over 100 different colours for the painted finishes on the carbon fibre bodies. The vehicles also feature a wide range of luxurious materials that were uncommon in the automotive field, such as porcelain, crystal, special types of leather and wood, gold and platinum. Each Bugatti configured by a customer is unique. Including options, the average price of the vehicles recently sold is €2.3 million.

It goes without saying that Bugatti is already working on the sequel to its recent success story, with development of its next model well underway. “With the next Bugatti model, we are aiming to consolidate and expand the market-leading position we have established with the Veyron,” the Bugatti President explains. “Our challenge is to make the best even better.”

The 450th Veyron: Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”

The last of the 450 Veyron supercars is the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”. It draws its sheer force from a 1,200 PS, 8-litre, W16 engine which provides a breathtaking maximum torque of 1,500 Nm. It sprints from zero to 100 km/h in just 2.6 seconds and can achieve a top speed of 410 km/h.

The “La Finale” design is a modern homage to chassis number 1

“When designing the “La Finale”, the designers sought inspiration from the first Veyron in order to provide a visual conclusion to the success story of this super sports car,” says Bugatti’s chief designer Achim Anscheidt. “Although both vehicles have a black and red colour scheme, chassis numbers one and 450 still have their own individual character which we have identified visually. Ultimately, every Veyron is unique.” The owner of the Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale” also had a say in the design of the vehicle.

Première for red exposed carbon fibre

The design of the carbon bodywork of “La Finale” is based on chassis number one which was designed ten years ago in the traditional Bugatti two-tone colour scheme, which was popular in Bugatti models of the 1920s and 1930s. This striking design language remains inseparable from the Veyron to this day. For the “La Finale”, the front wing panels, the doors and the areas between the doors and the side air intakes, known as “medallions” in French, are made from black exposed carbon fibre. The other parts of the outer shell are made from red exposed carbon fibre, the first time this colour has ever been used on a vehicle. Including this new colour, Bugatti now offers a total of eight different tints for exposed carbon fibre. The French luxury brand is an industry leader in terms of not only the diversity of the colour schemes it offers, but also in relation to the quality and processing of the exposed carbon fibre.

Unusually for a Veyron, the name of the Grand Sport Vitesse has been incorporated into the outer shell. The “La Finale” lettering, which highlights the extra significance of this particular super sports car, appears twice: once very clearly under the right front headlight and then in a slightly concealed position on the underside of the rear wing. In both cases, the bright “Italian Red” lettering is painted into the black exposed carbon fibre.

For the first time in a Veyron, the air scoops and intercooler cover have been painted black. The EB logo and the relief “16.4″ have also been emblazoned on it in Italian Red.

The wheel design is also in keeping with the red and black colour scheme. It is worth mentioning the hubcaps that were milled from a single block of aluminium – another example of the tremendous lengths that Bugatti goes to in the production of its vehicles. And that’s not all: each hubcap features a relief of the famous Bugatti elephant that was created during the milling process and then painted black. Rembrandt Bugatti, renowned sculptor and brother of company founder Ettore, designed this figure which was later used as a radiator cap on the Type 41 Royale and subsequently became a symbol of the brand. The elephant can also be found on the red fuel tank cover and oil cap as a black anodised insert made from milled aluminium.

An interior of strong, sophisticated contrasts

As with the exterior, the interior of the “La Finale” also pays tribute to the first Veyron. It was upholstered entirely in leather in a light beige colour known as “Silk”. Leather also adds a refined touch to the interior of the “La Finale”, where it features in the centre seat panels, the footwell, the headliner, the cowling and the rear wall. Unlike chassis number one, the designers and the customer have settled on contrasting colours for chassis number 450, selecting a striking red tone known as “Hot Spur”. This red appears in the arm rests, the instrument panel, the dashboard, the side bolsters and on the steering wheel rim, which is also decorated with stitching in “Silk” beige.

Red exposed carbon fibre is also used in the interior: on the centre tunnel, on the inserts in the centre console, on the door panels and seat shells.

The red head restraints are adorned with “La Finale” lettering embroidered in “Silk” colour. The lettering is found again in “Italian Red” in the door sill strips, etched into the black exposed carbon fibre.

The jewel in the interior is undoubtedly the Bugatti elephant on the stowage compartment cover made from red exposed carbon fibre and located in the rear panel between the seats. The elephant was cast in bronze with great technical skill, given a black patina, and then worked into the cover as an insert. The lettering “450/450″ has been painted in black under the bronze cast.

The Geneva International Motor Show will be staged from 5 to 15 March 2015 at the Palexpo exhibition centre in Geneva. The Bugatti exhibit is in hall 1.

The impossible made possible

The Bugatti Veyron – a technical masterpiece

When the Bugatti Veyron was first announced at the end of the nineties, many people were sceptical that the basic parameters could ever work. With more than 1,000 PS, a top speed in excess of 400 km/h, acceleration from nought to one hundred in less than three seconds, the doubters thought it simply impossible to produce a super sports car with this level of performance while remaining controllable and drivable. But that’s not all. Bugatti had set the bar even higher with its intention to produce a comfortable road car that was suitable for everyday use.

The development of the Veyron was one of the most significant technical challenges ever undertaken by the automotive industry. Bugatti engineers had to push the limits of physics and do things that had never been done before in automotive development.

Structure and materials. Very few parts, components or systems from existing vehicle concepts could be used in the Veyron. Everything had to be developed from scratch to achieve the required performance before being incorporated into the vehicle. When creating the Veyron, designers regularly drew inspiration from other industries which required extreme speeds and demanded extreme stress loads from materials and systems.

One key objective in the development of this exceptional vehicle was to achieve maximum longitudinal and lateral dynamics combined with optimum safety for the driver and front passenger. To do so, the Bugatti development team came up with a winning combination of rigidity and lightweight construction for use in the fastest roadster in the world.

Bugatti selected materials with optimum characteristics for each area of the Veyron, designed specifically to cope with the relevant loads. Criteria included lightness, tensile strength, formability, heat resistance, and non-splintering.

The passenger compartment of the Veyron consists of extremely strong yet feather-light carbon fibre. Like a Formula 1 racing car, it is designed as a monocoque and weighs around 110 pounds. The rear of the monocoque contains a cavity modelled to house the 100-litre fuel tank. This central vehicle structure is completed by a fixed, highly complex frame structure at the front and rear. The torsional rigidity from axis to axis is approximately 45,000 Nm per degree, almost double that found in modern production sports cars. This excellent structural rigidity ensures extremely precise driving performance in bends, with excellent stability under braking and acceleration.

The engine and gearbox assembly and the supporting frame for the rear of the vehicle are mounted with carbon fibre brackets manufactured using a resin infiltration process. These components must endure continuous temperatures of up to 170 degrees due to their proximity to the exhaust system and turbochargers. Bugatti developed these new heat-resistant materials and production methods especially for the Veyron and thus for the automotive industry. Both have since found their way into the aviation industry.

The front end of the Veyron is firmly connected to the front of the monocoque and consists of a 34 kg lightweight aluminium frame structure which essentially performs two functions. Firstly, it holds the front end components including the front axle differential, the cooling packages, steering system and the battery. Secondly, the front end also acts as a crash structure that is designed to deform and absorb kinetic energy in the event of an accident.

Torsion-resistant and lightweight upper longitudinal members made from carbon fibre are mounted at the rear of the monocoque. A carbon fibre cross member bolted to the two longitudinal members forms the rear end of the frame structure.

Titanium was the first choice for the bolts used to connect the three parts of the vehicle – the front end, monocoque and rear chassis. The advantage of titanium bolts over steel screw bolts is that they provide maximum strength but weigh less, a feature that Bugatti drew from the aviation industry. The Veyron was the first production car in the automotive industry to use titanium bolts. It was also Bugatti that subjected these bolts to continuous load testing to ensure that they could be used in a vehicle.

Carbon fibre plays an important role in the Veyron due to its properties, which have been developed to withstand extreme loads, but also for aesthetic reasons. Bugatti is the market leader in exposed carbon fibre. No other manufacturer in the automotive industry manages to produce exposed carbon fibre of such immaculate quality. Material authenticity is the defining principle – everything is genuine, there is no overlamination. The carbon mats are grouped and superimposed by hand and with a keen eye for precision to ensure perfect, symmetrical alignment of the fibres on the vehicle body and other components. Up to twelve layers of lacquer and paint are then applied by hand, resulting in clear-coated carbon fibre with unparalleled colour depth and brilliance. Bugatti currently offers eight colours: blue, grey, black, green, brown, purple, turquoise, and now also red. No other manufacturer offers this range of colours. Exposed carbon fibre has since become an extremely popular option amongst Bugatti customers. Bugatti has also transferred this expertise to other Group brands for small series vehicles and certain customised options.

Engine. The heart and soul of the Veyron is the 8-litre W16 engine with four turbochargers, which initially generated 1,001 PS, and an incredible 1,200 PS in later models. The 16-cylinder mid-engine is 710 mm in length, no longer than a conventional V12 engine, and weighs just 490 kg due to its lightweight construction, despite its output. The engine is fully capable of operating under a continuous full load, a feat that engines designed for use in motor racing cannot achieve.

Its compact dimensions are due to the unique arrangement of its cylinder banks in a W configuration. Two VR8 blocks, each with a 15-degree bank angle, are joined in the crankcase to form one engine. Both eight cylinders are set at an angle of 90 degrees to each other and are aspirated by a total of four exhaust gas turbochargers.

The Bugatti development team created a hugely complex drive unit in order to convert the power output of the 64-valve engine into driving dynamics suitable for both everyday traffic and the race track. If the extreme engine power alone is an ingenious masterpiece, transferring it to the road was an equally demanding challenge.

Development work focussed on the engine’s extremely high performance, in addition to its unique compact nature. Lightweight materials are used that not only result in a low power-to- weight ratio, but also provide a spontaneous response from the moving masses inside the engine. In addition to titanium piston rods, known as “easy runners”, the eight-stage oil pump integrated into the crankcase for dry sump lubrication has light aluminium gears. Only a small mass flywheel is required as the layout of the 16-cylinder engine already ensures smooth running. The use of motor sport technology is evident not only in the plasma-coated cylinder running faces, but also in the use of high-strength steel for the shafts and gears in the aluminium crankcase.

Gearbox. The Veyron is equipped with the dual-clutch gearbox (DSG), which is the fastest gearbox in the world. Bugatti was the first manufacturer to use a seven-speed variant of the DSG. Designed specially for the new sports car, this gearbox has a job which any other gearbox would baulk at, i.e. to transfer engine torque of up to 1,500 Nm to the road surface.

At the time, the dual-clutch transmission used in the Veyron was a unique combination of the dynamic advantages of a manual gearbox with the convenience functions of automatic transmission. When it was developed, no other manufacturer outside of Volkswagen AG was using comparable gearbox technology.
Adaptive boost-pressure fuel injection. In a high-performance vehicle such as the Veyron, it is essential that the engine is always supplied with constant fuel pressure. This also required a new development, and so Bugatti invented three-phase injection pumps which, unlike conventional plus/minus polarised pumps, are able to supply the engine with the required amounts of fuel continuously at a constant pressure.

The fuel tank also had to be redesigned. Bugatti turned to the world of motorsport but had to rebuild the conventional fuel tank used in racing, which is not permitted for road vehicles, to ensure that it would be approved. Bugatti consulted engineers in the aerospace industry, and the outcome was a fuel tank with an external Teflon coating which provides the fuel pump with a constant supply of fuel in every situation, up to a residual capacity of three litres and maximum lateral acceleration of 1.4 g.

Cooling. Cooling is an extremely important aspect of the Veyron. Sophisticated airflow patterns were devised to conduct sufficient cooling air to the vehicle’s radiators and extract hot air without compromising the vehicle design – a key consideration.

During combustion, some 2,400 PS of additional heat is generated for every 1,200 PS of drive power. To cope with this, the Bugatti engine has two water circuits. The larger circuit contains 40 litres of coolant water in three coolers in the front section of the vehicle to keep the engine at operating temperature. The second, a low-temperature circuit with a separate water pump, contains 20 litres of coolant water. This system cools the charged air and helps to prevent the car from overheating in slow traffic, which is a common problem in high-performance sports cars.

Tyres. For the Veyron, Bugatti worked in partnership with Michelin to develop the world’s first mass-produced tyre that can withstand speeds in the region of 400 km/h. The production tyres can be used in all speed ranges, which means that the Veyron does not require a different set of tyres when being driven at maximum speed. This was an important criterion which the developers had to fulfill in relation to the vehicle’s everyday practicality.

One exciting detail of tyre development is the new tyre pressure sensor that had to be developed for the Veyron. Centrifugal forces of up to 130 kg are generated at speeds in excess of 400 km/h. This required extensive tests on a test stand used for aircraft gas turbines in order to simulate the high speeds of the Veyron wheels. At the time, this kind of system was not available in the automotive industry.

Brakes. Bugatti developed a high-performance braking system featuring unique components in order to control powerful forces effectively and bring the vehicle to a halt safely and quickly. Certain components were designed in conjunction with development partners from the aerospace industry.

Experiencing the Bugatti’s braking system in action is just as much of a thrill as the acceleration. Combined with the simultaneous application of the air brake, an aerodynamic braking function integrated into the rear wing, the Veyron generates deceleration values not encountered in any other production car.

The braking forces are distributed to a maximum of sixty percent on the front axle and forty percent to the rear axle.

Bugatti chose carbon-ceramic brake discs as the preferred material, the first time a company in the Volkswagen Group had done so, in order to achieve maximum braking performance and to withstand brake disc surface temperatures of 1,000 degrees. The relatively low material weight also greatly reduces unwanted impact on the steering. Titanium was used for the brake disc hub instead of the usual stainless steel. As a result, the Veyron had by far the strongest braking performance in the automotive industry and motorsport at the time.

The carbon disc brakes at the front are 400 millimetres in diameter (rear: 380 mm). An extremely rigid eight-piston monoblock caliper unit with four pads each, reinforced with a central bar and weighing just 5.7 kg, is used.

Variable aerodynamics. The Veyron’s design is an outstanding feature, which clearly sets the super sports car apart from other high-performance vehicles in the automotive industry. The shape and style of the Veyron are strongly based on the historical design DNA of the brand.

The strict requirement to stick to the design of the car did not always make life easy for the developers, and this was also the case in relation to the aerodynamics, which are clearly an essential element of a supercar.

The most important technical element on the Veyron, which solves the contradiction between design and aerodynamics, is the rear wing. At speeds above 200 km/h it provides additional optimisation of braking performance. The wing flips up to an angle of 55 degrees in less than 0.4 seconds, with important consequences. Firstly, it increases the rear downforce, thereby improving the distribution of braking power between the front and rear axles. Secondly, it increases the air resistance, as when an aircraft is landing. At high speeds, the air brake alone causes deceleration of up to 0.6 g. It is activated via the brake pressure. With standard tyres on appropriate road surfaces, the wheel brakes generate deceleration values of around 1.4 g. The Veyron can brake to a complete standstill from 400 km/h in under ten seconds.

Never before in automotive history did engineers have to set up a sports car for use on public roads, while being capable of the same ease and security of handling across such a wide range of speeds. The Bugatti team faced a major challenge when it came to maintaining a balance between what amounted to three aerodynamic requirement profiles. Firstly, the bodywork had to have minimum air resistance to ensure that it could still achieve extreme acceleration values in excess of 200 km/h and reach a maximum speed of more than 400 km/h. Secondly, the downforce conditions on the front and rear axles over the entire speed range had to be so sophisticated that the fastest production super car in the world would be as smooth as possible on the road. And thirdly, it was expected that all the extremely tightly-packed high-performance cooling units under the outer shell would be supplied with optimum airflow at all times.

The aerodynamic management of the Veyron is a fascinating high-tech solution that is unparalleled in contemporary automotive engineering. A computer-controlled central hydraulic system is the heart of the regulatory framework. It regulates the ground clearance of the all- wheel drive Veyron, using three speed-dependent levels. A front diffuser flap is installed on both sides of the underbody to increase the downforce. Both of these flaps open and close with the help of two hydraulic cylinders. The downforce at the rear is regulated by a diffuser in the underbody and by the rear spoiler.

Verdict. The Veyron’s incredible performance statistics have powered the automotive industry into new dimensions. In the process, Bugatti developed completely new technical solutions, some of which have found their way into other brands within the Group and beyond, and have even been used in other industries.

The Veyron is the first and only super sports car designed and built to handle any driving situation at any time in its production configuration. Where other super sports cars and hyper cars require special preparation for individual driving situations, the Veyron automatically adjusts its settings at lightning speed without any input from the driver. It can set itself up for maximum acceleration on long straights, twisty country roads or city traffic, ensuring that the Veyron always has an optimum setup to provide a comfortable ride.

The Veyron 16.4 was launched in 2005 and provided impressive evidence of just what Bugatti developers had achieved. This marked the beginning of a great success story, which continued in 2008 with the launch of the open version – the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport with 1,001 PS. In 2010, the Veyron 16.4 Super Sport with increased power of 1,200 PS was launched and was then joined by the roadster version, the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse, in 2012.

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Bugatti has sold the last Veyron

Bugatti sells the last Veyron

- Bugatti president Wolfgang Du?rheimer: “An unprecedented chapter in automobile history has reached its climax”
- World première for the 450th Veyron at the Geneva Motor Show
- Veyron is the world’s most powerful and fastest production supercar

Molsheim, 23rd February 2015. Bugatti has sold the 450th and last Veyron. 16
cylinders, 1,200 PS, a maximum torque of 1,500 Nm, 0 to 100 km/h in 2.5 seconds and a
world record speed of 431.072 km/h – these are the figures that describe the magic and
uniqueness of the ultimate supercar of the modern era. The Veyron has caused a
sensation across the world ever since its launch ten years ago. The Veyron is limited to
450 units: 300 long since sold-out coupés – the Veyron 16.4 delivering 1,001 PS and the
Veyron 16.4 Super Sport delivering 1,200 PS – and 150 roadsters – the Veyron 16.4
Grand Sport with 1,001 PS and the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse with 1,200 PS. The
final roadster has now been sold. Bugatti will be exhibiting the Veyron with chassis
number 450, the Grand Sport Vitesse “La Finale”, at the Geneva Motor Show (5 to 15
March 2015) as a world première.

“In the Veyron, Bugatti has created an automobile icon and established itself as the world’s
most exclusive supercar brand,” says Wolfgang Du?rheimer, President of Bugatti Automobiles
S.A.S. “So far no other carmaker has managed to successfully market a product that stands for
unique top-class technical performance and pure luxury in a comparable price/volume range.
An unprecedented chapter in automobile history has reached its climax.”

The development of the Bugatti Veyron represented one of the greatest technical challenges
ever in the automotive industry. The Bugatti developers were given four goals in the
specifications for the supercar: it should transfer more than 1,000 PS onto the road, drive faster
than 400 km/h, accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in less than three seconds and – the biggest
challenge – in this configuration still be suitable for driving ‘to the opera’ in comfort and style.
The Veyron 16.4 was presented in 2005 – the rest is history and a major success story. The
open-top version, the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport, followed in 2008. In 2010, the Veyron 16.4
Super Sport with increased power was launched and was then joined by the roadster version,
the Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse, in 2012.

“The Veyron is unique in many respects even ten years after its launch,” says Du?rheimer.

In addition to its unequalled technical and dynamic characteristics, the Veyron features a
timeless design. The supercar is the modern interpretation of Bugatti’s brand values “Art,
Forme, Technique” and its striking lines and details continue the design DNA of the French
luxury brand without compromise. Confirms Du?rheimer: “The Veyron is not just a masterpiece
of modern automobile design, it is more an automotive piece of art.”

“Besides the certainty of owning the world’s fastest production super sports car with a high
degree of individual exclusivity, Bugatti customers appreciate that, upon purchasing a Veyron,
they become part of the history of an automobile brand that is steeped in tradition,” says the
Bugatti president. “Many of the cars find their place in private collections and are purchased by
automobile connoisseurs as investments.” Including options, the average price of the vehicles
sold recently amounted to 2.3 million euros.

Bugatti will fittingly celebrate the icon that is the Veyron at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show.
The Alsace-based super sports car manufacturer will present the 450th vehicle as a world
première – alongside the Veyron with chassis number 1 that left the Atelier in Molsheim ten
years ago. A customer from the Middle East has secured number 450, the Grand Sport Vitesse
“La Finale”, for himself. This vehicle will represent a collector’s item of particular value.
The Geneva Motor Show will take place from 5 to 15 March 2015 at the Palexpo exhibition
centre in Geneva. The Bugatti exhibit is in hall 1.

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Top horsepower-per-dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

Bang for the buck. That quasi-scientific statistic is bandied about by motor heads everywhere from classrooms to barrooms, though the truth of the matter is that it’s exceedingly complex to measure. A fair performance-per-dollar index would include something like cross-referencing MSRP with point-to-point times on a track or driving route, which is obviously hard to do comprehensively.

But, for the sheer joy of talking about cars and playing with a big spreadsheet, there’s always the horsepower-per-dollar index, which is more straightforward, if hilariously flawed.

There are vagaries even with this simple formula, of course: MSRP for vehicles can change at a moments notice, to say nothing of the bottom-line shifting that happens with local deals or showroom haggling. For my list, I’m running with the straight MSRP wherever possible, and as recently reported as I can get it. All the vehicles on my list are 2015 models (with the exception of a few exotics that seem to shun formal model year designation), and all trims are reported where the lowest price and differing power levels intersect. Some choices were made for personal preference (I listed models with a coupe/convertible variant separately), and some for my sanity (I avoided things like all 48 trim levels of the same Ford Transit, all with the same horsepower).

In any case, my full spreadsheet is public here, so feel free to look, grouse and point out where my 633-car list should have been 634.

If this list were a simple top ten, or even a top fifty, you’d be bored to tears with all the red, white and blue that is represented. Following perfectly with conventional wisdom, American cars really do lead the world where hp/$ is concerned. The Toyota Tundra ($76.43/hp) and the Hyundai Genesis Coupe ($76.87/hp) rank third and fourth on the list, but you’ll scroll down to rank 26 before you find another import brand.

So, for the sake of variety (and the sheer joy of seeing a minivan ‘win’ one round of this thing) I’ve sorted out some top five and bottom five lists for broad power categories. Let’s dive in.

Less Than 100 Horsepower

05 2012 scion iq review1 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

Okay, okay, this is hardly a category I’ll grant you. But I’ve often tried to click off all the sub-100-hp cars on sale in the US, and making this list gave me an excuse to know that there are seven total, or five if you insist on lumping all the Smarts together.

It also illustrates that none of the tiny tikes bring cheap horsepower to the table. The segment-leading Chevy Spark asks just over $146 for each hp, good for just 283rd place in the total population. Oh, and that Smart Fortwo Electric Drive has hp on sale for about the same price as its very distant family cousin, the Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG (insert your favorite Smart joke here… I know you want to).

  1. Chevrolet Spark – 84 hp, $12,270, $146.07/hp
  2. Scion iQ – 94 hp, $15,665, $166.65/hp
  3. Mitsubishi Mirage – 74 hp, $12,995, $175.61/hp
  4. Smart Fortwo – 70 hp, $13,270, $189.57/hp
  5. Toyota Prius C – 99 hp, $19,540, $197.37/hp
  6. Smart Fortwo Convertible – 70 hp, $256.14/hp
  7. Smart Fortwo Electric Drive – 74 hp, $25,000, $337.84/hp

100 – 200 Horsepower

2015 gmc canyon 01 11 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

With everything from compact and midsize sedans, to light trucks, to crossovers and SUVs falling into the 100- to 200-hp range, this category is a huge one for cars the Average Joe actually buys. And, as you can see, the top of it is dominated by US products. GM’s new midsize truck twins bookend the top five, where the very reasonable $100/hp range is the order of the day.

The bottom of this hp range starts a trend you’ll see throughout this piece: categories dominated by very similar cars. Here, only the E250 BlueTEC stands out, with small, electric vehicles making up the rest of the bottom five. Electric propulsion for the masses has come a long way, but it’s still tough to make cheaply.

Least Expensive:

  1. Chevrolet Colorado 2.5L – 200 hp, $20,120, $100.60/hp
  2. Dodge Dart SXT 2.4L – 184 hp, $18,895, $102.69/hp
  3. Dodge Dart SE 2.0L – 160 hp, $16,495, $103.09/hp
  4. Chevrolet Sonic – 138 hp, $14,245, $103.22/hp
  5. GMC Canyon 2.5L – 200 hp, $20,995, $104.98/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Kia Soul EV – 109 hp, $33,700, $309.17/hp
  2. Volkswagen e-Golf – 115 hp, $35,445, $308.22/hp
  3. Fiat 500e – 111 hp, $31,800, $286.49/hp
  4. Nissan Leaf – 107 hp, $29,010, $271.12/hp
  5. Mercedes-Benz E250 BlueTEC – 195 hp, $51,800, $265.64

201 – 300 Horsepower

2014 grandcaravan models runningshot avp1 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

From over 200 to up to 300 ponies, some real performance cars can start to be had. The trouble is that most of them still charge a bit of a premium for the very best versions. So, while the V6-powered Mustang comes in third here, it’s our unlikely heroes, the Dodge Grand Caravan in its very cheapest American Value trim, and the blue-collar Ram Cargo Van, that take the cake. Not surprisingly, the two minivans and the Jeep Wrangler, all make good use of the Pentastar V6 that FCA US uses so well and so liberally across its product lines.

And for the bottom five, I’d like to show you something in a luxury diesel. In a torque-based list these five would do much better, but here in hp/$ land, they’re screwed.

Least Expensive:

  1. Dodge Grand Caravan American Value – 283 hp, $21,395, $75.60/hp
  2. Ram Cargo Van – 283 hp, $22,000, $77.74/hp
  3. Ford Mustang 3.7L – 300 hp, $23,600, $78.67/hp
  4. Jeep Wrangler – 285 hp, $22,705, $79.67/hp
  5. Chevrolet Silvarado 1500 4.3L – 297 hp, $26,105, $87.90/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Audi A8 TDI – 240 hp, $85,100, $354.58/hp
  2. BMW 740Ld xDrive – 255 hp, $82,500, $323.53/hp
  3. Audi A7 TDI – 240 hp, $68,300, $284.58/hp
  4. Mercedes-Benz GL350 BlueTEC – 240 hp, $63,600, $265.00/hp
  5. Porsche Cayenne Diesel – 240 hp, $61,700, $257.08/hp

301 – 400 Horsepower

2015 chevy camaro v61 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

Ladies and gentlemen, with an absurdly low $73.39 asked for each of its 323 horsepower the Chevy Camaro V6 is your power-per-buck champ. This group represents the heavy hitters overall, with the Camaro, Tundra and Genesis ranking one, four and five, respectively.

It’s also worth noting at this point that GM in general and Chevy in particular do very well with this metric. The Bowtie bags four top spots for the categories as you see them here.

As for the priciest participants from 301 to 400 hp? Say “hi” to the Porsche 911 range. Specifically (and somewhat satisfyingly) it’s the two variants of the 911 that get dissed the hardest, even by Porsche enthusiasts, the Targa and a couple of Cabriolets. Do the right thing: buy a 911 coupe, or a Boxster, or move on.

Least Expensive:

  1. Chevrolet Camaro 3.6L – 323 hp, $23,705, $73.39/hp
  2. Toyota Tundra 5.7L – 381 hp, $29,120, $76.43/hp
  3. Hyundai Genesis Coupe – 348 hp, $26,750, $76.87/hp
  4. Dodge Ram 2500 5.7L ­– 383 hp, $30,685, $80.12/hp
  5. Ford F-250 6.2L – 385 hp, $31,235, $81.13/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – 350 hp, $107,010, $305.74/hp
  2. Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet – 400 hp, $121,610, $304.03/hp
  3. Mercedes-Benz G550 – 382 hp, $115,400, $302.09/hp
  4. Porsche 911 Targa 4S – 400 hp, $116,200, $290.50/hp
  5. Porsche 911 Targa 4 – 350 hp, $101,600, $290.29/hp

401 – 500 Horsepower

2015 dodge challengers 41 11 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

With outputs up to 500 hp, we’re starting to get into some really serious performance territory. But the cars making up the top five of this segment stay under $100/hp, to a one. That’s impressive.

The Mustang GT ranks number two on the overall list, in fact, and that bruiser of an F-250 cracks the top 12.

The bottom tier in this power range has the widest delta yet from the top five. The Rolls-Royce Phantom is a massively posh outlier at $407k asked for ‘just’ 435 horsepower, it’s nearly $900/hp figure more than doubling the next closest Bentley Flying Spur V8. Standard of the world, indeed.

Least Expensive:

  1. Ford Mustang GT – 435 hp, $32,100, $73.79/hp
  2. Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack – 485 hp, $37,495, $77.31/hp
  3. Chevy Camaro SS – 426 hp, $33,505, $78.65/hp
  4. Ford Mustang GT Convertible – 420 hp, $36,210, $86.21/hp
  5. Ford F-250 6.7L – 440 hp, $39,715, $90.26/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Rolls-Royce Phantom – 453 hp, $407,400, $899.34/hp
  2. Bentley Flying Spur V8 – 500 hp, $195,100, $390.20/hp
  3. Bentley Continental V8 – 500 hp, $187,900, $375.80/hp
  4. Maserati GranTurismo Convertible – 444 hp, $145,740, $328.24/hp
  5. Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet – 430 hp, $133,795, $311.15/hp

501 – 600 Horsepower

001 2014 land rover range rover autobiography 11 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

Nearly the tippy-top of this exercise are the vehicles shoving out between 501 and 600 horsepower, where you’d think power would start to be fairly expensive across the board. But the fact is that average car on this list rates about $186/hp (or $175/hp if you take out the curve-wrecking hypercars), which every one of these top-five beasties surpasses.

GM V8s reign supreme at the top here, and that’s discounting the 2016 CTS-V that’s been left off this all model-year-2015 list. Jaguar Land Rover clearly has a good thing going with its widely used 5.0-liter V8, too.

On the bottom, not even the $601/hp figure thrown up by the Bentley Mulsanne can top the outrageous Rolls figure we saw above, but by and large things get spendy in the rare air over 500 hp.

Least Expensive:

  1. Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 – 580 hp, $55,505, $95.70/hp
  2. Cadillac CTS-V Coupe – 556 hp, $71,200, $128.06/hp
  3. Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 – 505 hp, $72,305, $143.18/hp
  4. Land Rover Range Rover Supercharged – 510 hp, $79,995, $156.85/hp
  5. Jaguar XFR – 510 hp, $83,550, $163.82/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Bentley Mulsanne – 505 hp, $303,700, $601.39
  2. Rolls-Royce Ghost – 563 hp, $286,750, $509.33/hp
  3. Aston Martin Vanquish – 565 hp, $283,295, $501.41/hp
  4. Ferrari 458 Speciale – 597 hp, $291,744, $488.68/hp
  5. Ferrari 458 Spider – 562 hp, $263,553, $468.96/hp

More Than 600 Horsepower

11 pagani huarya review 11 Top horsepower per dollar cars in 2015 [UPDATE]

At the very highest output levels, the performance bargains are so well known, and expected, that you probably didn’t even have to glance down. The Hellcat-powered Dodges that filled your news feeds this past summer are the unquestioned champs here, with less than $100 asked for each of their mighty 707 galloping ponies.

Tesla points out that not all electric cars have to charge a mint for their power. The P85D version of Tesla’s Model S asks a very reasonable $151 for its massive output, and really does point to the future of green performance value.

I’m going exhibit some bias here, too, and point out that the Nissan GT-R Nismo (which I love) boasts a figure of just $250/hp, making it just one horsepower shy of ranking sixth here.

Finally, has the bottom five of any list, ever, looked this good (hence the photo up top)? The lesson, really, is that if you’re going to buy a car that makes over 800 horsepower, you’re going to have to expect to pay thru the nose for it. Even though the MSRPs for most of that bottom five are pretty soft (getting a firm “base” price for a Pagani is like trying to catch a rainbow in your hand), the estimated horsepower prices are far enough spaced that the ranking is almost certainly accurate.

Least Expensive:

  1. Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat – 707 hp, $57,895, $81.89/hp
  2. Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat – 707 hp, $63,995, $90.52/hp
  3. Chevrolet Corvette Z06 – 650 hp, $78,000, $120.00/hp
  4. Dodge Viper SRT – 645 hp, $84,995, $131.78/hp
  5. Tesla Model S P85D – 691 hp, $104,500, $151.23/hp

Most Expensive:

  1. Pagani Huayra – 720 hp, $1,450,000 (est), $2,013.89/hp
  2. Bugatti Veyron 16.4 – 1001 hp, $1,900,000 (est), $1,898.10/hp
  3. Ferrari LaFerrari – 949 hp, $1,416,362, $1,492.48/hp
  4. McLaren P1 – 903 hp, $1,150,000, $1,273.53/hp
  5. Porsche 918 Spyder – 887 hp, $845,000, $952.65/hp

UPDATE: The Dodge Viper SRT is indeed the number four car on the list of least expensive hp/$ from 600 horsepower and over. Thanks to all that caught the mistake in comments.

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